The German Handwriting

I created this overview becauſe there are not enough complete ones. Juſt draw the letters. The German handwriting can be written without lifting your pen and has originally been written with broad nibs and later with pointed nibs but you can uſe whatever pen you like. Alſo make ſure to not place ligatures between wordparts. (This is true for all germanic languages.) Furthemore you can ſee how ü, ö and ä came to be. Inſtead of interſecting them, Germans ſtarted placing the e above the vowels. Later printing adopted the handwriting e above the vowels too. And ſince the Allied forbid German handwriting and printing fonts 1945, the e-ſtrokes are written as dots becauſe that is what is thought in ſchools. Engliſh writers ſhould alſo keep in mind that the German handwriting h is identical in ſhape to the Engiſh handwriting long ſ and not confuſe the two.

To increaſe readability you can write n and m with a ſtroke above for mm and nn and you ſhould alſo make the ſlants between n, u, m, e and i longer than the ſlants inſide of n and m and the little line connecting the e-ſtrokes ſhorter.

The letters and characters above are:
A B C D E F G H I J K L
M N O P Q
R S S St St T U V W X Y Z Z
a b c d e e f g h i j k l m n o p r ſ ſ ſt ſ ſt t t u v s s
ß ß w x y z z ch ck
. : , ; ! ? „“ - — ( ) ' F

You can find more letter tables and examples here:
deutsche-kurrentschrift.de/index.php?s=abc_antiqua_kurrent
kurrentschrift.net/index.php?s=alphabet
deutsche-handschrift.de/adsschreiben.php#schriftfeld